• Master the Basics of Good Content to Increase Sales

    Writing is difficult for a lot of people. You may worry about your mastery of grammar or vocabulary. Maybe you just don’t think you have anything interesting to say. But if you have something to sell, you need to learn the basics of good copy, at least until you can pay someone to do it for you.
     
    These basic tips can (and should) be used when writing your web copy, social media posts, newsletter, emails, or anything you’re using words to grab attention. Keep in mind that whatever you are writing you should always aim to be at least one of the following: 

    • Interesting
    • Entertaining
    • Educational/informative 

    Copywriting Tips for Beginners

    1. Get Human: share what’s going on in your life

    You are interesting and someone out there can identify with you and what you’re doing. Even if it’s just that you burned toast this morning, there’s someone who is nodding their head as they read your post. These types of human connections make people want to read more and get to know you which leads to potential sales. 
     

    2. Tie Your Product/service into Your Narrative

     As you are “getting human” and sharing your stories, think about what types of skills or qualities go into making a good <insert your type of business here>. For instance, I follow a writer on social media. I didn’t follow her because I read her books and loved them. I followed her because her daily life stories are so funny and mirror mine that I wanted them to show up in my stream. She never even mentions her books. But because she entertains me, I am going to buy her books because I can tell from her posts that she’s very skilled at what she does.
     
    Look for ways you can exhibit the skills people would associate with the type of business you’re in and tell stories around those things. Don’t tell people you are those things. Show people you are. 

    3. Ask Questions

    The easiest thing you can do to get people talking is to ask them about their own experiences. It makes them feel valued and it may help connect your audience to one another as well as to you. 
    Use Assumptive Agreements and “Are You with Me’s”
    I know, right?
     
    This is an example of a popular assumptive agreement. So is “Nobody wants that, right?” It invites people to agree with you and leaves little room to do otherwise. These types of phrases are also good ways to break up paragraphs, create white space to make pages scannable, and keep your reader with you. 

    4. Good Visuals

    Good visual aren’t words, but they draw people to read your words. In those cases, pretty pictures are nice but interesting is better. An interesting image forces people to read the text around it because they are trying to figure it out. A pretty image can stand alone; no further explanation is needed.
     

    5. Notice What You Like Online

    If you are in your own target demographic, pay attention to all the “junk” marketing you get and all the social media business posts you see. What do you like and what doesn’t work? Make a note of these things and use them to shape your own posts. The other day, just before lunch Chick-fil-a sent me a notification asking me if I wanted some of their golden nuggets. I thought about it for several hours. Guess where my kids ate last night?
     

    6. Spend Time on the Headings and Titles

    These lines are valuable. Titles will convince people to read. Headings break up text and are excellent places for keywords. Creating these is not a timed race. Since there are very few characters (you want to keep them short and punchy, for the most part), you want every word to serve a purpose. Headings and titles should: 
    • Tell the reader what the writing is about
    • Use powerful words that are in keeping with your business’ personality (don’t use “awesome” if you’re a conservative investment firm, for instance)
    • Use keywords
    • Spur interest
     
    Write your title. Then ask yourself, “so what?” or “and.” Revise to add the “so what” and ask it again. Eventually, there will be nothing left to ask. At that point cut any extra words, switch out boring words or add some exciting ones, and you have your title.
     
    For example:
    5 ways to make people like you
    -So what/when?
     
    5 ways to make people like you during the hiring process
    -So what/why should the reader care?
     
    5 ways to make people like you so you get the job
    -And?
     
    5 ways to “win the work” at your next job interview

     
    Writing does take time but if you think about your audience, their needs, struggles, and interests and how your own might mirror those, you will always have content topics and intriguing angles.

  • Recognizing Preble County's Young Professionals

     

    Congratulations, Stacy Fullmer, July 2021 Young Professional of the Month!

     

     

    Congratulations, Sydney Smith, June 2021 Young Professional of the Month!

    Congratulations, May 2021 Young Professional of the Month, Alexa Little!

    Congratulations, April 2021 Young Professional of the Month, Chelsea Sorrell!

    Congratulations, March 2021 Young Professional of the Month, Lisa White!


    Congratulations, February 2021 Young Professional of the Month, Greg Eley!


    Congratulations, January 2021 Young Professional of the Month Landen O'Banion! (Pictured: Preble Connect Steering Committee members Kate Duskey, Todd Appledown, O'Banion, Alexa Little)